Taxing nonprofits is an exercise in shortsightedness

Jul. 24, 2015 @ 12:47 PM

http://www.heraldsun.com/opinion/x399479219/Taxing-nonprofits-is-an-exercise-in-shortsightedness

Businesses, including charitable nonprofits, are a powerful and efficient force for positive social change – and we need their services now more than ever.

As board chair of United Way of the Greater Triangle and a long-time supporter of YMCAs, I am concerned about the Senate budget provisions that propose new financial burdens on North Carolina’s charitable nonprofits. If passed, these burdens would harm not only nonprofits, but the people and communities that depend on their services. Ironically, because non-profits often step in to cost-effectively relieve acute social problems that government can’t or won’t solve, these measures may actually increase the financial burden on the taxpayer and harm the long-term economic prosperity of our state.

If fiscal responsibility is our goal, then taxing nonprofits is a self-defeating move that legislators can and should reject.

Just two years ago, nonprofits received full refunds on the sales taxes they paid to support their charitable missions. In 2013, the Senate put a cap of $45 million on the refunds. This year, the Senate’s proposed budget includes a phased lowering of sales tax refunds, resulting in a roughly $1 million cap by 2020. The package would also limit the deductibility of charitable contributions on state income taxes, effectively eliminating any tax incentive for giving to nonprofits, regardless of size.

Taxing nonprofits will directly affect the communities they serve. Taking away an individual’s ability (some may say incentive) to claim a charitable exemption has the potential to dramatically reduce investments into the community. For an organization like United Way of the Greater Triangle, it puts $14 million at risk. To place an added burden on nonprofits, already struggling with increasing demands and shrinking resources, is to take resources away from North Carolinians in need.

This is a one-two punch that nonprofits and North Carolinians can ill afford.

Through my work with the Redwoods Group — a social enterprise dedicated to insuring and protecting youth-serving organizations — I have seen firsthand how nonprofit organizations often complement and work with both for-profit businesses and government agencies to advance the public good – a goal everyone, especially legislators, should strive for.

While I understand and respect the goal of tax reform, I am confident placing additional tax burdens on nonprofits is not the best way to achieve it. One simply cannot look at nonprofits solely through the lens of a budget. Rather, I implore legislators to consider the ripple effect that harming nonprofits would have on the entire state.

This proposed measure may be well-intended, but it appears to be short-sighted and counterproductive. Nonprofits should be allowed to continue to do the very thing they exist to do– provide programs and services that maximize community benefit and public good for all residents of North Carolina.

Kevin Trapani is president and CEO of The Redwoods Group and board chair of the United Way of the Triangle.

Envisioning a New Model for Volunteering

hclWe partnered with HCL on their “Bring your sons and daughters to work at HCL” day hosted by the company’s Women Connect Network on May 1st. This endeavor was the first volunteer project that United Way hosted with a corporate partner, their employees and their children. With our new focus in Community Impact on families and children together, this was an opportunity to reflect that focus through volunteerism.

By hosting a volunteer project on a family-focused day, the company highlighted the importance of service. “HCL takes great pride in fulfilling our social responsibility and giving back to the community,” said Eugenia B. Jones, Diversity and Inclusion Partner at HCL.

The pre-teens and teens learned about the challenges that some of their peers experience right in their hometowns. Some children were so stirred by hearing about hungry children in the area that they overstuffed their meal kits and expressed a sincere desire to do more to help.

One of the HCL employees who brought her children to work on May 1st is Donna, from Durham. She brought her 14 year old daughter, Talayna, and her 12 year old son, Isaiah, to HCL for the day. She believes that volunteering can be an effort for the entire family, and sometimes the motivation to volunteer can come from a child in the family. Donna’s 14 year old daughter asked if she could volunteer at the same animal protection society from where she adopted her cat. Talayna aspires to become a veterinarian and loves animals; her mother has encouraged, and even volunteered with her once a month at their local animal protection society.

Because of the family’s experience volunteering already, Donna’s children were excited to participate in the United Way facilitated volunteer projects and together with 20 other children and adolescents at HCL, they:

  •         Assembled 250 healthy snack kits
  •         Created 77 bookmarks
  •         Created 153 flash card sets
  •         Created 69 encouragement cards for young readers

Through the HCL day, Donna and her children were able to forge good memories. Reflecting on that day, Donna says that her children felt encouraged and enjoyed helping put together packages and items that would bring a smile to other children in the Triangle. When asked why she wanted her children to participate in the “Bring your sons and daughters to work at HCL day,” Donna says that she wanted to continue to nurture her children’s desire to give back through volunteering, and to let them know that when they give back to the community, they are making a difference in the lives of others.

Donna hopes that her family will volunteer more and make an effort to do so year round. She excitedly encouraged United Way to “keep opportunities coming” for her family to connect and engage with the community. On our end, we’re eager to connect with other corporate and community partners to spark a tradition of intergenerational, year-round volunteerism through similar efforts as the “Bring your sons and daughters to work at HCL day.”

Days of Action 2015: Orange, Durham, Wake, & Johnston

DoA.logo_
United Way of the Greater Triangle invites you to participate in this year’s Days of Action, June 15-19, 2015. Day of Action is a point in time when we stand together as members of this Triangle community and mobilize the caring power of community to build long-term, sustainable change. We recognize that to make real change in our community, we must stand together every day.  Beginning Monday, June 15, join us for lunch at food truck rodeos throughout the Triangle to learn about our collaborative work, share your opinions, feedback, and ideas for improving our communities. Together, we can make a greater impact on the people we serve in Orange, Durham, Wake and Johnston counties.

On Friday, June 19, 2015, join us to help provide 1,000 weekend meals children in our community.  One in five children is food insecure in the Triangle every day.  This problem is compounded in the summer months when children don’t have access to the free and reduced lunch programs available during the school year.  In just two hours, volunteers will pack bags with enough food for meals for an entire weekend to benefit children at four Durham elementary schools.  Meal bag contents meet the guidelines of Inter-Faith Food Shuttle’s Backpack Buddies program which provides weekend meals to children throughout the school year.  With your help, we can provide weekend meals to students this summer.  Space is limited; register here today.

Days of Action Schedule

Day of Action:  Orange
Monday, June 15, 2015
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Town Commons –  301 W. Main Street, Carrboro 27510
Food Truck & Conversation Event

Day of Action:  Durham
Tuesday, June 16, 2015
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
North Carolina School of Science and Math –  1219 Broad Street, Durham 27705
Food Truck & Conversation Event

Day of Action:  Wake
Wednesday, June 17, 2015
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Wake Technical Community College – 9101 Fayetteville Road, Raleigh 27603
Food Truck & Conversation Event

Day of Action:  Johnston
Thursday, June 18, 2015
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Sleep Inn & Suites –  207 N. Equity Drive, Smithfield 27577
Food Truck & Conversation Event

Day of Action:  Volunteer
Date:     Friday, June 19, 2015
Time:     10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Location:  The Pavilion at Durham Central Park – 501 Foster Street, Durham 27701
Weekend Meal Packing Volunteer Event (Register here)

Thank you for #Uniting4Good for our community.

Open Letter from our Board of Directors Chair

“If I have the belief that I can do it, I shall surely acquire the capacity to do it even if I may not have it at the beginning.” -Mahatma Gandhi

I am inspired to serve the community through United Way. Our board of directors recently made momentous and courageous decisions— decisions that will help shape social change in our community for generations. Our current system of social justice requires new ways to solve persistent problems. Our new model of funding only promising or proven collaborations has been clearly communicated over a long period of time and is backed up by powerful data. Collective impact is hard, but it works. We know all that, but choosing this path is uncomfortable… we are not yet expert at this model. But because of our commitment to the Strategic Plan we adopted, we’ll stick to this path and, as Ghandi says, we’ll “acquire the capacity to do it….”

The time is right for our approach as we activate our networks around transformative change.  United Way is the answer: the partner every employer needs to build relevance into relationships. It’s time to unlock the transformational power of the relationships we have by using them as channels to connect human, social, intellectual and, yes, financial capital with the causes that matter most.

I “have the belief that we can do this”. With community leaders, academic experts, forward-thinking employers, committed public servants and so many others, we will succeed. And, as a result and over time, tens of thousands of families in our community will move from desperation to prosperity.

Executing bold vision is hard. Maintaining the status quo is easy. This week, we chose hard. We chose to change the course of history.

Thank you.

Kevin Trapani

Board of Directors Chair

United Way of the Greater Triangle

New Direction at United Way of the Greater Triangle Builds Collaborations

Contact: Irene Godínez, igodinez@unitedwaytriangle.org, 919-627-7511, 919-463-5013 

MORRISVILLE— On May 19, the Board of Directors of United Way of the Greater Triangle (UWGT) approved the strategic direction to encourage, and nurture area collaboratives that support a two-generational approach to families and their children in low income households.  In development for over a year, the shift positions United Way as a community partner and funder to help build long-term, sustainable solutions to some of our area’s most pressing issues. Through research of local and national reports and data, agency feedback sessions, volunteer workgroups and donor feedback, the new direction—a move to collective impact—will make the greatest impact where it is most needed, in addition to continuing to support those who cannot afford or obtain basic necessities.

“Our model of funding only promising or proven collaborations has been clearly communicated over a long period of time and is backed up by powerful data.” said Kevin Trapani, Chair of the Board of Directors at United Way of the Greater Triangle. “Collective impact is hard, but it works.”

In November 2014, UWGT developed and released a Community Action Plan for the four counties served, Durham, Johnston, Orange, and Wake, informed by extensive research and community feedback. The new direction at United Way reflects a national growing movement in recognition that the issues we face are not singular in nature and need to be addressed through collaborative and integrated approaches. With this evolution comes an approach of supporting and building (not just funding) collaborative work that will help create, scale and sustain solutions. This will be accomplished by being more intentional, with a focus on working from the “outside in” by targeting populations—who will have a meaningful voice in the work—instead of from the “inside out” by funding programs. Collaboration and innovation are the hallmark of the Triangle and we want to continue moving in that direction.

“We know we cannot create change alone. Moving forward requires strong partnerships with current and new agencies and organizations that recognize by working together we can make a greater impact on the people we serve,” noted UWGT President and CEO Mack Koonce. “The promise of tomorrow lies in the bold actions of today.”

###

About United Way of the Greater Triangle (UWGT)
United Way is committed to supporting immediate basic needs and working toward long-term, sustainable solutions to some of the area’s most pressing issues in four North Carolina counties, Durham, Johnston, Orange, and Wake. A new focus on low income families and children uses a collaborative approach to dramatically change the course of their futures. UWGT actively mobilizes the caring power of communities to build resources, focus investments, and foster partnerships to improve lives and inspire generations of achievement.

Learn more about UWGT’s work at unitedwaytriangle.org or volunteer opportunities at http://www.unitedwaytriangle.org/volunteer.

2400 Perimeter Park Drive, Suite 150 | Morrisville, North Carolina 27560 | 919.460.8687

 

“I wish I could do it again” Community Engagement Fellowship Experience

Curious about what it’s like to be a Community Engagement Fellow? Read some of the experiences from our past Fellows and then consider applying to be part of our 2015 cohort.

Katherine was our Community Engagement Fellow in our last cohort and now works at a nonprofit in the Triangle.

Katherine was one of our Community Engagement Fellows in our last cohort and now works at a nonprofit in the Triangle.

In my time as a Community Engagement Fellow, I gained a lot of skills, had unique opportunities, and learned several things that have been useful in my new position at a local, Triangle nonprofit agency. The biggest skills I gained were public speaking and story-telling.  The orientation session on public speaking was excellent. Some of the tools shared with us were invaluable, including: tips for remembering parts of a story, the structure of a story, as well as the the feedback from staff on our speaking skills. A key takeaway for me was learning to speak at a variety of events, both large and small, and to a variety of audiences – from corporate donors to people in retail to teachers and fellow nonprofit colleagues.  These are all skills that I’ve continued to refine since my time at UWGT, especially the lessons from the speaking engagements. This was HUGE for me – I now have the confidence to speak to any type of group and I still use the structure that UWGT gave us during orientation when I think about giving a speech!

Through my fellowship, I was given the opportunity to meet so many professionals from an array of backgrounds and across sectors – again, during my time there I worked with fellow nonprofits, schools, government entities, corporations, and even some retail entities.  I was given the opportunity to meet people from those sectors and I still run into people that I met during my time at UWGT.  The networking was beneficial both in making community connections and in refining my networking skills. The program also gave me an opportunity to refine my customer service and sales skills.

My current job in development and communications is heavily focused on engaging others through the organization’s mission and this is accomplished, in part, through storytelling. Again, my storytelling skills were greatly improved during the UWGT program.  I would also say that my time management skills were improved while at UWGT. Although we had supervisors, I liked that the position involved a good deal of autonomy in scheduling meetings and presentations.  I think that this fostered a sense of confidence and responsibility in the program participants, creating an environment where they really cared about UWGT and the mission.

Lastly, my communication skills improved. Not only am I better equipped to communicate with supervisors, fellow employees, as well as professionals throughout the community, but I also learned a lot about social media best practices and marketing.  This has come in handy because part of my current job responsibilities is managing our social media and print collateral.

If you want to participate in a meaningful fellowship, where you’re gaining many new skills, and are making a difference in the community, then you should definitely apply for the Community Engagement fellowship.  I really enjoyed this program and wish I could do it again!


The fellowship is held at United Way of the Greater Triangle’s office in Morrisville, NC. As a fellow you will have the opportunity to travel and build relationships across the four county region we serve: Durham, Johnston, Orange, and Wake counties. For 2015 we will only be selecting 5 fellows.  Fellows must be available and participate in the mandatory trainings, July 8-10, and July 13-14. The fellowship requires a 37.5 hour Monday-Friday workweek. The 2015 Fellowship starts July 8 and ends November 20, 2015.  Fellows are expected to complete their entire term.  Fellows receive $12/hour during this fellowship.

Applications Open: Now
Applications Due: May 29, 2015
Round 1 Interviews: Week of June 1
Round 2 Interviews: Week of June 15
Mandatory Training: July 8-10, July 13-14
Program Start: July 8
Program End: November 20

How to Apply: Please send your cover letter, résumé and completed application to Mr. Stéphane Daniel by Friday, May 29, 2015 with the subject “UWGT Community Engagement Fellow Application.

Click here for a full description of the Community Fellowship

Click here to apply for a Community Fellowship

My Journey at United Way

Paige completed an internship with us, while completing her Senior year at NC State University.

Paige completed an internship with us, while completing her Senior year at NC State University.

I’ve spent the past 4 years of my undergraduate career solving engineering problems and by year 4, I knew it wasn’t for me. How did I reach that conclusion? Well during my freshman year at NC State, I developed a chronic illness that made walking to class almost impossible. That is when I had the idea to start a disability transportation service on campus and two years later, Wolfpack Pick Up became a reality. I wanted other students with disabilities or injuries to have an easier time getting to class so that they didn’t have to struggle like I did. Advocating, fundraising and directing the program was such an exciting and fulfilling experience that I knew I wanted to dedicate my career towards helping others.

With no concrete experience in the nonprofit sector, my mentor James Amato provided me with the amazing opportunity to work as a Resource Development Intern at United Way of the Greater Triangle.

From day one, I was so excited to join a team full of kind, passionate and generous individuals who wanted to help see me succeed. I worked under James and completed various tasks related to stewardship and donor cultivation. In case you were wondering, yes I did become an expert at printing address labels and writing thank you notes. So the tasks were simple, but I didn’t mind – I felt very fortunate to be in the United Way environment. It has been an amazing learning opportunity to understand how a nonprofit functions, but more specifically how United Way is leading the way in collaboration. Collaboration among organizations with limited resources and similar missions is the key to making lasting change in the community.

United Way of the Greater Triangle has also provided me with opportunities to attend conferences and meet professionals trying to solve the major problems in our community. For instance, the Triangle Community Foundation hosted the What Matters Conference where the keynote speaker, Dan Heath, encouraged nonprofits to focus on the bright spots – or areas of success that can be scaled for a greater impact. Those professional development experiences helped me to better understand not only what issues need to be solved, but how to do it.

Over the past few months, I have gained the competence and confidence to step out into the nonprofit world and take the risks necessary to make change happen. United Way of the Greater Triangle has inspired me to commit to a career that not only improves lives, but helps to solve the major issues in the community. I plan to take that key of collaboration to open the doors towards a lasting impact. Thank you UWGT for giving me the opportunity to learn from the best!

Follow Wolfpack Pick Up: @wolfpackpickup 


Every year, United Way of the Greater Triangle invests in the leadership development of a cohort of five talented leaders and provides them with learning opportunities to sharpen their business acumen through the Community Engagement Fellowship. Fellows receive ongoing, top-notch training from area nonprofit and corporate leaders, and will have many opportunities to put their skills to use. Fellows have meaningful responsibilities, including clearly communicating the importance of giving and volunteering with United Way to the employees at their assigned companies. Fellows will also have unique opportunities to connect and build relationships with a network of over 500 area nonprofit organizations and businesses. The skill set acquired through this fellowship are transferable to any field and will be an asset in many settings.

If you have ever wondered what it’s like to work for a nonprofit, are committed to being a catalyst for positive change in our community, are eager to learn how to do accounts and project management, and have been described as an outgoing individual, then this may be the right opportunity for you.

The fellowship is held at United Way of the Greater Triangle’s office in Morrisville, NC. As a fellow you will have the opportunity to travel and build relationships across the four county region we serve: Durham, Johnston, Orange, and Wake counties. For 2015 we will only be selecting 5 fellows.  Fellows must be available and participate in the mandatory trainings, July 8-10, and July 13-14. The fellowship requires a 37.5 hour Monday-Friday workweek. The 2015 Fellowship starts July 8 and ends November 20, 2015.  Fellows are expected to complete their entire term.  Fellows receive $12/hour during this fellowship.

Applications Open: Now
Applications Due: May 29, 2015
Round 1 Interviews: Week of June 1
Round 2 Interviews: Week of June 15
Mandatory Training: July 8-10, July 13-14
Program Start: July 8
Program End: November 20

How to Apply: Please send your cover letter, résumé and completed application to Mr. Stéphane Daniel by Friday, May 29, 2015 with the subject “UWGT Community Engagement Fellow Application.

Click here for a full description of the Community Fellowship

Click here to apply for a Community Fellowship

 

United Way of the Greater Triangle redefining its purpose (Guest Blog Post)

By Timothy Hinson
Donor & Volunteer with UWGT

Tim (top left) volunteering in our reading kit assembly line after the Collaboration Lab

Tim (top left) volunteering in our reading kit assembly line after the Collaboration Lab

The Triangle region has been recognized with many accolades for being business friendly, having a great quality of life and a vibrant culture. However, behind these accolades, the very real pervasiveness of poverty is hidden in the Greater Triangle. Recognizing this, the United Way of the Greater Triangle (UWGT) is redefining its purpose and planning to strategically meet the needs of those in our communities who struggle to meet life’s most basic needs. Over the last few years, the United Way of the Greater Triangle has been working with its partners and other community service organizations to create unprecedented collaborative efforts between these organizations.

Recognizing the success the UWGT has had with its partners’ collaborative efforts, the organization is now in the planning stages of its Strategic Plan. This Plan will guide the UWGT as it works to provide “real solutions sparked by inspired action for transformative change” within our communities from now to year 2020. To continue inspire action for the change the UWGT plans to make over the next five years, this Strategic Plan is not being written in a vacuum. The UWGT is currently hosting a series of “Collaboration Labs” where it invites members of the community to understand the problems the UWGT aims to solve and provide input on how the Strategic Plan can guide the organization to a solution.

During the first Collaboration Lab, I had the opportunity to work with an incredibly diverse group of teachers, artists and business professionals to brainstorm on a variety of topics. In breakout groups, we brainstormed on how the UWGT could connect with those who need its services, and how the UWGT could become the voice of those it serves. We used an “Open Source Technology” exercise to individually focus on themes identified during our breakouts.

Despite the great ideas proposed during the Collaboration Lab, we were abundantly aware that the progress made during a collaboration session is nothing without action. Collaboration is easy, but implementation is hard. We trust, however, that we have provided the UWGT with tools they will use in the development of their upcoming Strategic Plan.

 

Note: A final Collaboration Lab will take place on May 14 in downtown Raleigh. Please email rsvp@unitedwaytriangle.org with “Collaboration Lab” in the Subject line for more information on how to participate.

“My Confidence Grew” Community Engagement Fellowship Experience

Curious about what it’s like to be a Community Engagement Fellow? Read some of the experiences from our past Fellows and then consider applying to be part of our 2015 cohort.

Madi.Comm_.EngagementFellow“As a Community Engagement Fellow I gained skills that I have been able to use in various settings, including my current job in a small office. I refined my skills in: public speaking, organization and communications.

My understanding of how nonprofits work also increased and I learned of all the different parts that must work together in order to make an organization like the United Way run smoothly.

My position at the United Way helped prepare me for my current work environment because I learned to communicate with various types of people. This has been very important since I work at a small office where everyone does a lot of different tasks and communication is key. For example, in my current job, it is important that I understand how the fundraising for a nonprofit works since I deal with the finances. Thanks to my fellowship, my confidence grew and I am able to successfully complete the variety of tasks, including fundraising which can be intimidating to many.

I enjoyed my experience and felt better prepared to take on responsibilities at other organizations because of the skills that I refined, and the knowledge that I gained.”

The fellowship is held at United Way of the Greater Triangle’s office in Morrisville, NC. As a fellow you will have the opportunity to travel and build relationships across the four county region we serve: Durham, Johnston, Orange, and Wake counties. For 2015 we will only be selecting 5 fellows.  Fellows must be available and participate in the mandatory trainings, July 8-10, and July 13-14. The fellowship requires a 37.5 hour Monday-Friday workweek. The 2015 Fellowship starts July 8 and ends November 20, 2015.  Fellows are expected to complete their entire term.  Fellows receive $12/hour during this fellowship.

Applications Open: Now
Applications Due: May 29, 2015
Round 1 Interviews: Week of June 1
Round 2 Interviews: Week of June 15
Mandatory Training: July 8-10, July 13-14
Program Start: July 8
Program End: November 20

How to Apply: Please send your cover letter, résumé and completed application to Mr. Stéphane Daniel by Friday, May 29, 2015 with the subject “UWGT Community Engagement Fellow Application.

Click here for a full description of the Community Fellowship

Click here to apply for a Community Fellowship

2014 Corporate Partners

Thanks to all of our 2014 Corporate Partners!

GlaxoSmithKline 
Duke Energy Progress 
Bayer CropScience
Nationwide Insurance
SunTrust Bank
The Redwoods Group
PNC Bank 
RTI International 
Caterpillar, Inc.
Eaton Corporation
First Citizens Bank
LORD Corporation
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina
Golden Corral Corporation 
John Deere Agriculture & Turf Division
Capitol Broadcasting Company, Inc.
Syngenta
Enterprise Holdings
Kellogg’s Snacks
HCL Technologies
Wells Fargo
AT&T
Belk, Inc. 
Genworth Financial
BB&T
UPS
Bank of America
Harris Teeter, Inc. 
The News & Observer
PSNC Energy
Target 
Lenovo
IAT Group
Zoetis
Sports Endeavors, Inc.
Telerent Leasing Corporation
NoveList
ABC 11 WTVD
Novo Nordisk Pharmaceutical Industies
Zachry Group
Gregory Poole Equipment Company
TE Connectivity
Walmart Stores, Inc.
Weatherby Healthcare
DuPont Electronics & Communications
Regency Centers
Fifth Third Bank
York Companies
Family Health International 
PCL Civil Constructors, Inc.
Macy’s 
Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
Erie Insurance Group
Publix Super Markets, Inc.
KBR
Poyner Spruill LLP
Norfolk Southern Foundation
Bryson Foundation Ltd.
S&ME, Inc.
Cormetech, Inc.
SCM Metal Products
Costco Wholesale #249 – Durham
General Electric
JC Penney
FedEx
Costco Wholesale #645 – Raleigh
Schneider Electric
Dillard’s Inc.
ITW Hi-Cone Division of Illinois Tool Works
O’Brien/Atkins Associates
Northwestern Mutual
Bagwell & Bagwell Insurance, LLC
Flextronics
NC Electric Membership Corp.
Cargill, Inc.
Acroprint Time Recorder Company
Brame Specialty Company, Inc.
TrustAtlantic Bank
Microsoft
Eli Lilly and Company
PetroLiance
The Curtis Foundation, Inc.
Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors Matt and Suzanne Case Fund
Triangle Community Foundation – Dougherty Family Charitable Trust Fund
Lawyers Mutual Liability Insurance Company of NC, Inc.
Nordstrom
Johnson Controls, Inc. – Raleigh
Raymond James & Associates, Inc.
Williams Mullen
CSL Plasma
Johnston County Schools 
State Farm Insurance Company
Piedmont Natural Gas
Best Buy
Triangle Community Foundation – Stephen and Judy Draper Fund
Foundation for the Carolinas Thomas H Cuthbertson Donor Advised Fund
Wilmore Electronics Co, Inc.
KDI Capital Partners
CenturyLink
Lowe’s Home Improvement Stores
Regions Bank
Sentinel Risk Advisors
Greene Resources Inc.
GENBAND